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Amazing Hikes Around Prince George

Today's post will cover 7 different hikes in the Prince George area. I have done 2 of these hikes and really want to do more. I have tried to include as much as I can about each location and for the two locations that I have hiked myself I have included a video.

 

Ancient Forest

The Ancient Forest/Chun T’oh Whudujut Park and Protected Area is British Columbia’s newest park and is quickly becoming one of the “must do” parks to see and hike in British Columbia.

Nestled in the traditional territory of the Lheidli T’enneh, the Park protects a portion of the only inland temperate rainforest in the world. Hiking the Ancient Forest trail will bring you past thousand year old western red cedars and a rich biodiversity of plants, mosses, lichens and fungi. The 450 metre long universal access boardwalk provides the opportunity for people with all abilities to experience this majestic area. Another 2.3 km of boardwalk provides access to magnificent “Big” Tree, Tree Beard, Radies Tree and a beautiful cascading waterfall.


Established Date: May 19, 2016 for the park and June 13, 2016 for the protected area. Park Size: 11,190 hectares Protected Area Size: 685 hectares



 

Teapot Mountain

Teapot mountain is a short, but steep hike leading to amazing views to the west and north. Make sure you bring your camera!


After arriving at the trail head, parked and gear on your back hardest part of the hike begins. 800 metres (2500') of elevation gain over the course of 1.2 km (0.8 miles) is crazy steep. Some of the hike consists of switch backs, straight up the mountain and climbing over big ankle twisting rocks, stumps and logs. While hiking up, there are also a few places that have tea pots hanging from the trees. Try and see how many you can spot.

When the grueling (but so worth it) part of the hike is over, the trail takes you around the mountain to the west side. There are two awesome viewing areas that are one after the other, but be warned, if you are afraid of heights then stay away from the edge. It is a sheer drop of at least a few hundred feet and more in some sections. If you aren't afraid of heights and go close to the edge just be extra careful! You can hike up anytime of day but hiking up to see the sunset was much better than the middle of the day would have been, minus those pesky mosquitoes that come out at dusk and dawn. Just make sure you bring a couple flashlights and a headlamp if you decide to do a sunrise or sunset hike.

Don't forget to make sure you pack out what you pack in as the recreation site isn't maintained very often and there are no garbage bins anywhere close. There is also a pit toilet that you can can use at the base of mountain. If you bring a dog on your hike make sure you bring a leash and put them on it once you get to the top, even a sure footed dog could slip over the edge.

 

Fort George Canyon

Fort George is a beautiful Canyon with big and small volcanic rock islands. The hike to Fort George Canyon is relatively flat for the first half of the hike and then gradually starts to descend into the canyon with the final stretch a switchback trek right to the water. It starts out walking through a cut block for around 2km and then you head into a lush green forest full of wild roses, bunchberry, ferns, alder, fireweed and many other plants. There are a few boardwalks over swampy bodies of water that can get slippery when wet so walk over them carefully. Luckily most of this hike has cell phone service so if there is an emergency it is easier to get a hold of the emergency services. Always remember when you are in Northern BC it is bear and cougar country so be vigilant while you are anywhere away from civilization. During late summer when the Fraser River water level is low you are able to walk to some of the islands in the middle of the big river. Always use caution when walking through a river, especially one the size of the Fraser River.


Fort George Canyon and the area have a rich history. In the early 1900s the only access to Northern BC was via the Fraser River. Steam paddle wheelers were used to travel up the river and they had to navigate through the canyon. Which, at the time, was quite a treacherous task. Here is an excerpt from the BC Parks site about the history of the Fraser River and this specific area. "The Fraser River is designated as a Canadian Heritage River and Provincial Heritage River. As the largest river in British Columbia, and the most productive salmon fishery in the world, the Fraser River has played a major role in supporting human life along its length. Locally, Fort George Canyon was an important fishing site for First Nations peoples. The river was an important route for early explorers. In more recent years, the river was used as a route for transportation of people and resources. Fort George Canyon was one of the few obstacles along the river in north central British Columbia. In the early 1900’s sternwheelers would have to be winched through this treacherous section of river while passengers would have to portage."


 

War Falls

Easy hike along McLeod River culminating in the biggest of three waterfalls at the end of the trail. The hike down to the main waterfall (War Falls) is a short one, and it's downhill most of the way. War Falls trail skirts along the McLeod River, which flows from War Lake. There are a couple of viewpoints along the trail to take in the smaller waterfalls along the river. The end of the trail gets you to a platform viewpoint of War Falls. During the summer months (July, August and September) in the park you can walk right up to the falls as it is shallow enough to get there. In the spring due to the snowmelt, the river is flowing much too powerfully to get to the base of War Falls. Regardless of what time of year you visit; it's still a beautiful waterfall and a hidden gem. Carp Lake Provincial Park is in the remote wilderness of Northern British Columbia, with no cell phone coverage. Please be Bear Aware and Wildlife Aware as there are Moose, Elk, Cougar, Grizzly Bears, and Black Bears in the area.

 

Ridgeview Lake Loop

This great beginner hiking trail allows you to enjoy beautiful views of Ridgeview Lake. Starting at the Eskers Provinicial Park parking area, walk along the trail past the marsh view point and continue on until you cross a small bridge and see a Park Map. Turn left walking along Ridgeview Lake. There are interpretive signs on the trail explaining the types of plants and trees in the park. The trail continues further on gradual ups and downs walking through open areas and through beautifully forested areas. Some of the trees you will see in the park are Black Pine, Birch, Lodgepole Pine, and many more. Each time you get to a fork in the road there is a park map telling you where you are currently that way you don't have to worry about getting lost. Once you make it up Ridgeview Lakes ridge you get a beautiful view of the lake and there are two benches to relax in and soak up the sunshine and view. The only sounds you hear are the birds chirping and the wind softly blowing by. It is such a lovely and peaceful hike for any level of hiker.


Fires aren't permitted in the park and if you bring your dog they are supposed to be leashed the whole time. Keep on the trails as well. There is no need to veer off them. Fishing is allowed at the lakes farther into the park, but make sure you have a proper fishing license before heading out there.

 

Hellroaring Falls

Explore a surreal moss-covered forest surrounded by an old growth Hemlock leading to Hellroaring Falls. Once you are at the trailhead, the hike to the falls is relatively short. The first section of the trail is a bit overgrown with devils club. I would recommend wearing pants and not shorts. There is a steep hill at the beginning, with a rope for assistance and then the trail quickly levels out. The last bit of the walk is absolutely beautiful. The whole forest is covered with moss as if it were straight out of a fairy tale. After walking through the mossy forest there is a bit of a scramble down to the VERY slippery rocks to view the wonderful Hellroaring Falls.


Please be careful walking on the slippery rocks, it hurts when you fall on them.

 

Upper Morkill Falls

Take a scenic dirt road drive to the impressive and huge Upper Morkill Falls plus two other pretty waterfalls across from the main waterfall. As soon as you park in the small gravel parking lot you will be able to hear the thunderous sound of the Upper Morkill Falls. It is the most impressive waterfall in the Robson Valley and with good reason. The viewpoint brings you right to the top of Upper Morkill Falls where it feels as though you can almost touch it. The waterfall is so loud that you have to yell to the person standing next to you. To top it off there are two waterfalls adjacent to Upper Morkill Falls, one is clearly visible across the river and the other is off to the left in the trees. The walk to the viewpoint is less than a minute long.


Safety Tip: Be VERY careful standing near the edge of the waterfall as there are NO guard rails or any safety devices to prevent you from falling.

 

Hope you enjoyed today's post. While some of these are not really long hikes, (like the one above); I still consider them hikes and thought it would be good to include them.

 

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